Category: nature photography

Island of Mousa, Shetland

This is a small uninhabited island, which mainly serves as a nature reserve. There you can also find the Broch of Mousa, which is preserved almost in its entirety. The Mousa Boat takes you across for a few hours from April to September, before the stormy winter season begins. We were able to watch birds and seals from the distance and enjoyed the circular walk along the beautiful cliffs before the boat took us back to the mainland of Shetland. 

Here you can see Mousa Broch up close.

My Youtube video about the trip to the Island of Mousa.

So pristine 🌻

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Inchewan Path near Dunkeld, Scotland

This was a wholesome walk on a lovely day with just a few soft showers thrown into the mix. For me, this area never fails to deliver in scenery and beauty and it is one of my favourite walks, as you may already know. Along the way, I have continued my experimentation with close-up photography and I ended up ‘accidentally’ finding many critters, when I was trying to photograph the plants. It just shows you how alive this place is.  

Moody Sunrise.

Up close and personal | Flora and Fauna in Perthshire, Scotland

I used the simple trick of turning the lens around to be able to get very close to the object. This way of photography reveals a whole new world of details and structures.

Nature doing it’s thing 🌿

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Walking the Scottish Highlands | Glencoe | The Hidden Valley – Coire Gabhail

Part 1 | Part 2

The Hidden Valley (“Coire Gabhail” in Gaelic, meaning “hollow of the spoils”) is somewhere that can only be reached by ascending a fairly steep and rocky path (or descending from the mountains surrounding it). It was used by members of Clan MacDonald to hide the cattle that they had stolen, for which they demanded ransom from the owners. Cattle raiding was a custom that stretched into prehistory, but was simply considered a nuisance by the 17th Century. Clan MacDonald often had feuds with Clan Campbell, which resulted in the Glencoe Massacre in 1692. The surviving members of Clan MacDonald took refuge in the Hidden Valley.

Walking the Scottish Highlands | Glencoe | The Hidden Valley – Coire Gabhail

Part 1 | Part 2

The Hidden Valley (“Coire Gabhail” in Gaelic, meaning “hollow of the spoils”) is somewhere that can only be reached by ascending a fairly steep and rocky path (or descending from the mountains surrounding it). It was used by members of Clan MacDonald to hide the cattle that they had stolen, for which they demanded ransom from the owners. Cattle raiding was a custom that stretched into prehistory, but was simply considered a nuisance by the 17th Century. Clan MacDonald often had feuds with Clan Campbell, which resulted in the Glencoe Massacre in 1692. The surviving members of Clan MacDonald took refuge in the Hidden Valley.

Driving through the Western Scottish Highlands | Trossachs National Park and Glencoe

Rodney Gardens, Perth, Scotland

A tranquil place with beautiful flowers and free to visit. If you happen to be in Perth, I can only recommend it. It’s just on the other side of the river Tay.