Category: nature photography

Horsehead Highlights 

Who sees the horsehead drinking from the ocean?

Purchase your print HERE

Slieve Croob and the surrounding countryside, Northern Ireland

Slieve Croob can be translated to ‘Mountain of the Hoof’ and though it is not very high (534 m), it is apparently over 380 Million years old, even older than the Mourne Mountains, which you can see looming on the other side. This whole area was once shaped by big ice sheets pushing down from Donegal during the Ice Age. On top of Slieve Croob you find the 12 Cairns, which are Neolithic burial chambers (possibly put together from one big one originally). Neolithic farming communities would settle in the fertile valleys below between 4000BC and 2000BC and they have erected many impressive stone structures all around the area. Slieve Croob was also traditionally the place where Lughnasa was celebrated, the festival dedicated to the Celtic sun god Lugh. It was celebrated in August to prolong the period of sunshine into the harvest months. People would pick bilberries (also known as ‘blaeberries’, giving it the name ‘Blaeberry Sunday’) on the way up and then sing, dance and play the fiddle. This was done on Slieve Croob well into the 1950s.

A Northern Ireland vlog is up on Youtube. 

Inside x Out
Which one do you choose 1 or 2?

Many times visiting this 100+ year old abandoned train tunnel I have seen it in many conditions. If I were to choose my favourite it’ll have to be 1 due to it being an oldie of mine and still a best seller.
Which ones your favourite? 1 or 2? Let me know below.

Inside x Out
Which one do you choose 1 or 2?

Many times visiting this 100+ year old abandoned train tunnel I have seen it in many conditions. If I were to choose my favourite it’ll have to be 1 due to it being an oldie of mine and still a best seller.
Which ones your favourite? 1 or 2? Let me know below.

Shining Through.

Nature therapy 💦🌲

Follow me on Instagram!

Shark Fin by Manuel Dietrich

Location: Phang Nga, Thailand ⛰

St Ninian’s Isle, Shetland

This island can be reached via a ‘tombolo’, which forms this interesting X-shape. (A ‘tombolo’ is a strip of land, often created through deposited material over time, which attaches an island to the mainland, creating a ‘tied island’.) There you find the remains of a 12th Century chapel, dedicated to St Ninian. On the 4th of July 1958 a local schoolboy by the name of Douglas Coutts discovered treasure under a slab marked with a cross on the chapel site. It turned out to be 28 pieces of Pictish silver artefacts, many of them jewellery, and the jawbone of a porpoise. This treasure was likely hidden during a Viking raid around 800 AD. The original items can be seen in the National Museum of Scotland.  

Video footage here. 

Wildlife around the Island of Mousa: Seals (known as ‘selkies’ on Shetland), European shags (’scarfs’, a species of cormorant) and Orca whales.

Tour of Mousa Island

Northmavine Peninsula coastline, Shetland

After going up Ronas Hill we wanted to explore some more of the area that we could see from the top of the hill. The day was ending and we were quite tired, so we only saw a glimpse of the rock formations and sea stacks, but what we saw was very impressive, especially bathed in the light of the setting sun. The stretch between Hillswick and Tangwick is particularly beautiful, which is what you see in the first four pictures, including the peculiar pointy rocks known as ‘The Drongs’ (4th photo, also visible from the top of Ronas Hill). Then we drove over to the Eshaness area and stopped at Tangwick to watch the seals relax among the rocky shore. 

Shetland Day 5 

Our whole Shetland trip in a playlist