Category: mountains

Almost no sign of civilization 🍂

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Slieve Croob and the surrounding countryside, Northern Ireland

Slieve Croob can be translated to ‘Mountain of the Hoof’ and though it is not very high (534 m), it is apparently over 380 Million years old, even older than the Mourne Mountains, which you can see looming on the other side. This whole area was once shaped by big ice sheets pushing down from Donegal during the Ice Age. On top of Slieve Croob you find the 12 Cairns, which are Neolithic burial chambers (possibly put together from one big one originally). Neolithic farming communities would settle in the fertile valleys below between 4000BC and 2000BC and they have erected many impressive stone structures all around the area. Slieve Croob was also traditionally the place where Lughnasa was celebrated, the festival dedicated to the Celtic sun god Lugh. It was celebrated in August to prolong the period of sunshine into the harvest months. People would pick bilberries (also known as ‘blaeberries’, giving it the name ‘Blaeberry Sunday’) on the way up and then sing, dance and play the fiddle. This was done on Slieve Croob well into the 1950s.

A Northern Ireland vlog is up on Youtube. 

Alpenglow in the Dolomites 🌄❤️
by
Roman Huber

Location: Dolomites

Southern Yellowhead Hwy, BC

https://www.instagram.com/calebestphotography/

Sunrise over Ha Ling Peak in Canmore, AB

https://www.instagram.com/calebestphotography/

‘Last Light’ – (2019)

I have no idea why but the foreground that I captured here reminds me off a Dragon Egg, well just a cracked egg but my first thought was a dragon egg. Let me know if you see it too, if not I’ll get help…

www.coreycrawfordimagery.com

Walking the Scottish Highlands | Glencoe | Coire Gabhail – The Hidden Valley

Walking the Scottish Highlands | Glencoe | The Hidden Valley – Coire Gabhail

Part 1 | Part 2

The Hidden Valley (“Coire Gabhail” in Gaelic, meaning “hollow of the spoils”) is somewhere that can only be reached by ascending a fairly steep and rocky path (or descending from the mountains surrounding it). It was used by members of Clan MacDonald to hide the cattle that they had stolen, for which they demanded ransom from the owners. Cattle raiding was a custom that stretched into prehistory, but was simply considered a nuisance by the 17th Century. Clan MacDonald often had feuds with Clan Campbell, which resulted in the Glencoe Massacre in 1692. The surviving members of Clan MacDonald took refuge in the Hidden Valley.

Walking the Scottish Highlands | Glencoe | The Hidden Valley – Coire Gabhail

Part 1 | Part 2

The Hidden Valley (“Coire Gabhail” in Gaelic, meaning “hollow of the spoils”) is somewhere that can only be reached by ascending a fairly steep and rocky path (or descending from the mountains surrounding it). It was used by members of Clan MacDonald to hide the cattle that they had stolen, for which they demanded ransom from the owners. Cattle raiding was a custom that stretched into prehistory, but was simply considered a nuisance by the 17th Century. Clan MacDonald often had feuds with Clan Campbell, which resulted in the Glencoe Massacre in 1692. The surviving members of Clan MacDonald took refuge in the Hidden Valley.

Driving through the Western Scottish Highlands | Trossachs National Park and Glencoe